Homeowners Insurance - Quote Request

Fast and easy quote request.

As an independent insurance agency, we can access multiple markets to insure you receive the coverage that best suits your needs..

  • Homeowners

  • Landlord / Rental

  • Manufactured / Mobile Homes

  • Motorhomes

  • Specialty Dwelling

  • Renters /  Tenant

  • Vacant Homes

Property Information

Property address to be insured

Date Purchased

Year Built

Square Footage

Replacement Cost (if known)

Foundation Type (if known)

Open or closed foundation?

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Attached garage?

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Garage size

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Construction Type

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Siding

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Usage Type

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Occupancy

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Residence Type

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Roof Material

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Roof Shape

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Distance to Fire Hydrant

Distance to Fire Station

Protection Class (if known)

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Do you have a pool?

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Does the pool have a slide?

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Is the pool fenced?

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Protection Devices

Smoke

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Temperature

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Burglary

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Renovations

Wiring

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Plumbing

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Heating

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Roofing

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Roof Material

  1. Asphalt Shingles
    Asphalt shingles are the most common roofing materials in America because they’re effective in all environmental conditions.
     

  2. Solar Tiles
    Advanced solar collectors integrate seamlessly into existing shingles, generating up to 1 kilowatt of energy per 100 square feet. They’re particularly good for sunny roofs in homeowners’ associations that forbid typical solar panels. While they may help offset energy costs with solar power, they also cost more than traditional solar options.
     

  3. Metal Roofing
    Metal roofing comes in vertical panels or shingles resembling slate, tile and shake – and lasts about 60 years. Metal excels at sloughing off heavy snow and rain, won’t burn and resists high winds. It is lightweight and can be installed over existing roofs.
     

  4. Slate
    Slate roofing lasts more than 100 years. It won’t burn, is waterproof and resists mold and fungus. Slate is effective in wet climates but is expensive, heavy and may be easily broken when stepped on. Keep this in mind if you live in an area that experiences hail.
     

  5. Stone-coated Steel
    Interlocking panels mimic slate, clay or shingles and resist damage caused by heavy rains (up to 8.8 inches per hour), winds of 120 miles per hour, uplifting, hail and freeze-thaw cycles.
     

  6. Rubber Slate
    Rubber slate looks natural and can be cut with a knife to fit intricate roofs like those found on Victorian homes. Rubber slate roofs can last 100 years but can be damaged by satellite dishes and walking – so may also be susceptible to damage by hail, similar to slate.

  7. Clay and Concrete Tiles
    Clay and concrete roof tiles can withstand damage from tornadoes, hurricanes or winds up to 125 miles per hour and even earthquakes.
     

  8. Green Roofs
    Green roofs are covered with plants and can improve air quality, reduce water runoff and insulate homes to reduce urban heat islands. However, they need extra structural support, a vapor barrier, thermal insulation, waterproofing, drainage, water filtration, soil, compost, and plants. Their estimated lifespan is 40 years.
     

  9. Built-up Roofing
    This heavy roofing consists of layers of asphalt, tar or adhesive topped with aggregate and is only for flat roofs. Tar and gravel roofs, also for flat roofs, are best for roof-top decks with heavy foot traffic. These roofs may become sticky in summer, and it is harder to shovel snow off of these roofs when compared to smooth surfaces. They can last 20 to 25 years.

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Roof Shape

  1. Flat Roof
    Flat roofs are truly flat. Flat roofs have a slight pitch to drain water the pitch is not obvious.

     

  2. Pyramid Roof
    Imagine a pyramid – that’s what a pyramid hip roof looks like. One of the simplest types of roofs for houses, a pyramid hip roof has four slanted sides. The slides meet at one point which is the tip of the roof.
     

  3. Gable Roof
    A gable roof is the most common type of roof shape. It’s characterized by two slopes that meet at the top. The sides of the slopes are open.

     

  4. Shed Roof
    A shed roof is also called a skillion roof. It’s characterized by a single slope.

     

  5. Curved Roof
    Curved roofing systems reduce the indoor temperature and are popular in windy regions.

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